(Source: verticalart)

2:38 pm, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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l-freeman69:

Buzzcocks - “Ever Fallen in Love (With Someone You Shouldn’t’ve)”

(Source: afueras)

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4:27 am, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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3:32 pm, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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Tell me about it

(Source: floccinaucinihilipilificationa)

12:19 pm, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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For children, childhood is timeless. It is always the present. Everything is in the present tense. Of course, they have memories. Of course, time shifts a little for them and Christmas comes round in the end. But they don’t feel it. Today is what they feel, and when they say ‘When I grow up,’ there is always an edge of disbelief—how could they ever be other than what they are?

8:07 am, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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zombiesenelghetto:

The Clash: Paul Simonon photo by Janet Macoska 1979

11:55 pm, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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I knew it wasn’t too important, but it made me sad anyway.

11:50 pm, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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10:15 pm, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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I really wish Kim was still with them

(Source: godmods)

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11:43 pm, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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For a long time, memory researchers assumed that memories were like volumes stored in a library. When your brain remembered something, it was simply searching through the stacks and then reading aloud from whatever passage it discovered. But some scientists now believe that memories effectively get rewritten every time they’re activated, thanks to a process called reconsolidation. To create a synaptic connection between two neurons the associative link that is at the heart of all neuronal learning you need protein synthesis. Studies on rats suggest that if you block protein synthesis during the execution of learned behavior pushing a lever to get food, for instance the learned behavior disappears. It appears that instead of simply recalling a memory that had been forged days or months ago, the brain is forging it all over again, in a new associative context. In a sense, when we remember something, we create a new memory, one that is shaped by the changes that have happened to our brain since the memory last occurred to us.

Slate Magazine, “The Science of Eternal Sunshine by Steven, March 22, 2004

(via evoketheforms)

10:42 pm, reblogged by coinoperatedbarb
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